Sacred Earth

Exploring nature and culture

Nature Notes 

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice is upon us – the longest night is here!

It has been a difficult year. I hope you and yours have found a way through. The Winter-Solstice marks the darkest point, the longest night of the year. 

The trees have lost their leaves and all signs of life have retreated below ground. The countryside is bare. The sun barely rises above the horizon and shines only a feeble light. Birds have departed. The Earth has entered hibernation mode.

Yet, at these dark times, we find cause to rejoice! For deep within the Earth, a tiny light has been born! Fragile as a baby in its crib the new sun-savior god has returned.

We are at the threshold of a new cycle. As yet, we do not know if the baby will grow. Nevertheless, where there is life, there is hope.

In the old days, the 12 days of Christmas marked the time when the veil between the worlds is thinnest – corresponding to the 12 days of Mid-Summer. Spirits and ghosts are passing through, howling frightfully during the night. The period of celebration culminated on January 6th, when, according to the Christian tradition, the Three Kings finally found the stable where the sun-god had been born.

The Solstice is a time of reflection, of sharing the memories of the summer past and of gratitude. The year may have demanded heavy sacrifices from all of us, but it has also let us realise that the things we took for granted are what is truly matters. The crisis is not over, but there is hope on the horizon. During this quiet space we can reflect on what we want to manifest next year and how we can make things better, not just for ourselves, but for the community of which we are a part.

Winter Solstice is a festive time despite being the shortest day and longest night.  It marks the turning point and harbors the promise of things to come. Especially so this year as it coincides with the Jupiter/Saturn conjunction, which will be visible for the first time in 800 years December 21, 2020.

This is a time to count one’s blessings and to celebrate hope. The wheel of time is turning. The light has returned. Let us cherish this little flame of hope so it may grow strong and return life to Earth once more.

Welcome to the Sacred Earth website!

Hi there! Thanks for stopping by! My name is Kat Morgenstern, and I am delighted that you have found your way here!

I have created the Sacred Earth website as a forum for nature lovers of all stripes. Come and join me on a journey down the garden path, and off into the virtual woods, where we will explore, learn and discover all about the intertwining roots of nature and culture.

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Current issue

Ever heard of Lion’s Mane Mushrooms?

Ever heard of Lion’s Mane Mushrooms?

The Magical Kingdom of Mushrooms

I have always been interested in mushrooms and many years ago started foraging for easily identifiable species. But over the years, it gradually began to dawn on me: mushrooms are a special kind of wonderful.

It is not just the sheer variety of colours, shapes, and sizes that is mind-boggling. Yet, until recently, science put little effort into trying to understand them. Even though they don’t produce chlorophyll, and cannot photosynthesize, they had long been lumped together with plants. As it turns out, fungi have a kingdom all of their own.

We are unaware of fungi because all we see, are their spore-producing fruiting bodies. The much greater part, a vast spreading network of matted fibres called mycelium, is hidden below ground. These fragile strands are all-important for the well-being of Mother Earth. Mycologists are just beginning to realize that we could not exist without them.

Like most people, I considered mushrooms primarily as a category of food. But since I live in Western Europe, the variety available at the market is limited. There are the familiar cardboard mushrooms aka field mushrooms that are available all year round, and a few seasonal species: Oyster mushrooms, Chanterelles, and very occasionally, Porcini mushrooms. And that’s it.

 

Medicinal Mushrooms

 

By chance, I discovered that mushrooms play a much more important role in Southeast Asia, not just as foods but also as medicines.

I knew of Chaga and Shiitake as being used medicinally. Both have a long list of credentials. But I was unaware of the real scope of these mysterious mushroom medicines.

Lion's Mane MushroomMy interest was piqued when I first spotted this really weird looking-mushroom on one of my local mushroom forays. I had never seen anything like it! A whitish-cream colored, shaggy-looking thing that reminded me of a coral, or a miniature cascading stalactite, or a mop. But certainly not of a mushroom. It grew in clumps, each seemingly flowing into the next. I was instantly smitten.

At home, I identified the mystery mushroom as Lion’s Mane, Hericium Erinaceus, an edible mushroom with some remarkable healing properties.

 

So, what can Lion’s Mane Mushroom do?

 

Lion’s Mane is known for its power to enhance cognitive function – all kinds of mental processes, including memory.

As a writer, I spend a lot of time in front of the computer, and in the evening I often felt mentally exhausted. A tired mind is an irritable mind. I found myself overreacting to trivial irritations. Concentration fades after so many hours, and sometimes I just couldn’t stay focused. My go-to stimulants of choice were coffee or chocolate, but that soon backfired when I found that I had a hard time going to sleep.

I tried Vitamin B, which helped, but not enough. When I found out about Lion’s Mane, I had to give it a try. When I started to take 1 capsule of the extract along with a compound vitamin B supplement, I began to notice an effect almost immediately. Now, about three months down the road, I can honestly say, it has changed my life. I only take one capsule instead of the recommended two, together with the B vitamins.

My mental stamina has improved significantly without any kind of side effects. There is no caffeine-type ‘buzz’, no trouble going to sleep, no signs of exhaustion. Lion’s Mane seems to just tune the system, so it can operate more smoothly, making me feel more balanced, patient, and capable.

I am sure, everyone around me appreciates it, too.

 

 What does the science say?

I love Lion’s Mane as brain food, but it can potentially do a lot more. Recent studies have mostly been done on animals, but the results are promising. Research has focused on Lion Mane’s effects on neurological conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Disease, depression, and anxiety – all with preliminary positive results. Lion’s Mane has anti-inflammatory, immune system boosting powers, and it has also shown positive effects on the digestive system.

What’s not to like?

I will write more about these findings in another article. Here, I just wanted to share my personal experience, which has been remarkable. Try it yourself!

Images by Henk Monster, CC BY 3.0  via Wikimedia Commons 

Plant Profile:

Frankincense (Boswellia sp.)

Frankincense (Boswellia sp.)

Featured image by Mauro Raffaelli, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Plant Profile: Frankincense

Frankincense is well-known as ‘that stuff that is burnt in church’. But what exactly is it, and where does it come from?

In common parlance, ‘Frankincense’ is often used as a generic term for all kinds of incense, but botanically, it refers to oleoresin sourced from  Boswellia trees.

Description:

The Boswellia genus has its greatest distribution in tropical regions of Africa and Asia. It comprises small shrubs or trees that are rich in fragrant oleoresins and well-adapted to arid and inhospitable terrain.

Four species are classified as Frankincense trees:

  • Boswellia sacra (syn. Boswellia carteri, southern Arabia)
  • Boswellia serrata (Indian Frankincense, syn. Boswellia thurifera)
  • Boswellia papyrifera ( Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan)
  • Boswellia frereana (Horn of Africa)

The Biblical Frankincense is derived from Boswellia sacra, a small, shrubby desert tree with pinnate leaflets and thorny branches found in Oman. It lives on rocky slopes and ravines.

In India, Boswellia serrata is the most common variety. It is a more stately tree that usually has divided trunks.

Small, 5-petaled whitish-yellow flowers appear in axillary racemes. The trees frequently seem to be growing directly from the rocks and boulders to which they cling with adaptive, disk-like swellings at the bottom of the trunk. But these adaptations only develop in response to the environment, if necessary.

Excessive harvesting reduces the number of flowers and the size and viability of the seeds. Cattle and camels browse on the leaves and branches, especially in times of drought.

Name:

The name ‘Frankincense’ probably came from the old French expression, ‘franc encens’ meaning ‘valuable incense’. Frankincense is also known as ‘Olibanum’, which derives from the Arab word ‘al Luban’, meaning ‘milk’, an allusion to the milky sap that turns into Frankincense when it dries.

Boswellia serrata - Indian Frankincense

Dinesh Valke from Thane, India, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

History

Familiar by name, yet obscure. The source of Frankincense has been shrouded in mystery since long before the birth of Christ. The origins of its use are uncertain, but it is well-documented that Frankincense was widely used in the Egyptian Temples to honour Ra and Horus. On her epic journey, Queen Sheba brought along numerous Frankincense trees as a special gift for King Solomon. Unfortunately, those trees were doomed. Frankincense trees only thrive in arid conditions and are limited to a specific geographic range. But, it’s the thought that counts. The gift was a significant sign of honour and respect.

Incense fuelled the economy of the Arab world, much as oil does today. Towns positioned at strategic locations along spice or incense routes prospered considerably from this trade. In the Ancient World, Frankincense was more valuable than gold. The obscurity of its origin gave rise to wild tales. Frankincense trees were said to be guarded by dragon-like creatures, ready to strike out at any intruder. Keen to protect their fortunes, traders had invented such terrifying stories to deter enterprising and adventurous young men from going off in search of the trees.

But, scare tactics aside, the long journey across the desert was indeed as dangerous as it was lucrative.

Tree Stewardship

Oman, Somalia and Ethiopia are the most important suppliers of Frankincense today. As in the days of Solomon, the most common use of Frankincense is to honour the Gods. While the average annual quantities used have decreased since Solomon’s times, science has found new applications. Harvesting is still done using the traditional method of bleeding wild trees. Although uncultivated, individual trees ‘belong’  to particular families who live nearby (by unspoken agreement). These families look after the trees and claim the right to harvest them.

In the ancient world, all Frankincense trees were considered the property of the King. It fell on him to negotiate the harvesting rights with the merchants, for a percentage of the profits, of course. Studies show that families who take a ‘guardian’ role towards the trees are more likely to use sustainable practices. Unlike the roaming harvesters, who don’t care much about the welfare of a particular tree, any desert dweller will naturally want to protect the source of their livelihood.

Harvesting

Harvesting Frankincense is a time-consuming process. Several deep incisions are cut into the tree trunk, and a small piece of bark is removed. (According to modern research, more than five incisions causes considerable stress to the trees.) This wounding causes the tree to ‘bleed’, and a milky white substance protrudes that seals and heals the wound to prevent infection. After three months, the resin has hardened enough to scrape off the tree trunk. This ‘bleeding’ process is repeated three times to obtain the highest quality Frankincense. Only the resin collected from the final bleeding is rated as ‘superior quality. Once solidified, the resin is sorted into tears and grains of different colours and sizes. The quality is determined by the degree of opacity. Resin destined for distillation is shipped off while still slightly sticky inside. This indicates a high concentration of volatile oil.

Medicinal uses:

Most Frankincense is used for religious purposes. But it also has a long history as an ingredient of medicines and cosmetic preparations. Early writers such as Pliny, Dioscorides and Avicenna have recorded such uses of Frankincense as were common in their time. But in time, the therapeutic properties had been all but forgotten – until some years ago, when new studies found Frankincense effective for a wide range of hard-to-treat diseases.

The ethnomedicinal applications of Frankincense are very diverse, ranging from dental disease to skin conditions, respiratory complaints and digestive troubles. In the Ancient World, every part of the tree was used: root, bark, bud, flower, fruit and resin and essential oil.

Astringent

The powdered bark was used to make an astringent paste for swellings (oedema). Mastitis was treated by boiling the dried or fresh gum in the patient’s own milk to form a thick paste for topical application.

The bark’s astringent properties are used in ointments for treating sores and chapped skin. Emperor Nero is said to have used a pomade made from a mixture of resin and wax to disguise the tell-tale bags beneath his eyes that appeared after a night of excess.

Vulnerary

The charred, powdered bark was kept as a first aid application for wounds. Mixed with water, it made an instant dressing for injuries and burns. If available, the fresh bark was also used for this purpose. The lotion provides an excellent antiseptic wash to clean dirty or infected wounds.

The bark was also used for setting broken bones. Two pieces of the wood were used as splints, with strips of Frankincense bark wrapped around them to hold in place a bandage that had been soaked in soft resin. The drying resin helped to provide firm support for the mending bone.

Child Birth

Frankincense also played a role in women’s medicine. Chewing the bark alleviates morning sickness. A potion made from snakeskin and resin dissolved in wine was said to ease difficult or prolonged labour. Frankincense was burnt for 40 days during and post-partum, to protect mother and child. Squatting over the smouldering resin was said to restore muscle tone and support healing of any laceration, and speed recovery from the strains of labour.

Eyes

Its antiseptic properties have also been used to treat ophthalmic diseases. In Ethiopia, the soot of the resin is believed to be beneficial for the eyes. Sore or tired eyes are fumigated with the smoke.

Teeth and gums

The resin was chewed as a ‘therapeutic chewing gum’ to stimulate the gums and treat dental infections such as gingivitis.

Stomach problems

A bark decoction makes a stimulating and cleansing tea. The inner root of young trees was chewed as a remedy for stomach problems. Buds and fruit were used as a cleansing tonic for the digestive system.  A decoction of Frankincense resin, cinnamon and cardamom, settles an upset stomach. 

Other uses

Even the incense was used therapeutically. The smoke acts as an expectorant and clears phlegm from the head and chest. It purifies the air and relaxes the patient while soothing their pain, especially severe headaches.

Frankincense smoke is a powerful insect deterrent, a  property that helps prevent serious diseases like malaria or dengue fever.

Frankincense is said to improve memory and dispel lethargy. An old recipe for an epilepsy treatment recommends boiling it in with hare’s lungs in white wine.

Modern uses

Modern research has focused on Olibanum’s anti-inflammatory properties, particularly to treat rheumatoid arthritis and soft tissue rheumatism. Frankincense extract is also effective for gastrointestinal diseases such as colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Censer

OTHER USES

Perfume

The clean, fresh, balsamic fragrance of Frankincense has perfumed our world since ancient times. Originally, the term ‘to perfume’ derived from the Latin ‘per fume’ meaning ‘to pass something through the smoke’.  Clothes were fumigated, not only to give them a pleasant scent but also to kill any pathogens. Perfuming is essentially a cleansing practice.

Today, the perfume industry uses Frankincense essential oil as a fixative to scent soaps, detergents and countless cosmetic articles.

The ancient Egyptians were pioneers in cosmetics and perfumery. Among other things, they invented the eyeliner known as Kajal (Khol). Khol was made from charred powdered resin mixed with waxes, oils and other substances. It was believed to protect and improve vision. Modern versions are still available, but no longer contain Frankincense.

Fresh, soft Frankincense resin can be used to seal minor cracks in pottery and other utensils. The gum hardens upon drying.  In combination with other resins, it has been used to caulk ships.

In Ancient Egypt, Frankincense and Myrrh were essential items in the funerary rites used to embalm the mummies in preparation for the afterlife.

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